Here are the ways Fort Worth schools provide mental health care to students


Carly Kandel ensures Briscoe Elementary is a good place for her students.

Nearly all of the Fort Worth ISD school’s students come from low-income homes, and their basic needs aren’t always being met, said Kandel, a program manager for Communities In Schools of Greater Tarrant County. 

Kandel does all she can to make students feel safe and as ready to learn as possible — food, warmth, clean clothes — whatever students need. 

“We can’t get to that higher level of thinking until we address all the things that are going on holistically for our kids,” she said.

Editor’s note

This is the first of a three-part series examining how Fort Worth-area schools are caring for students’ mental health.

School districts in Fort Worth use Communities In Schools as part of their toolkits to care for students’ well-being. They also offer counselors, telemedicine options and programs tailored to meet the specific needs of students. Research supports Kandel: Students whose mental health needs are addressed tend to perform better in school.

Communities In Schools has found 90% of students it serves see improved grades as well as better behavior — and 96% of students are promoted to the next grade.

Texas is among the states with a higher prevalence of mental illness and lower rates of access to care for young people, according to the national nonprofit Mental Health America. The group ranked the state last in mental health access in 2022.

Half of school districts in Texas have no mental health services. The rest offer some access or telehealth only — few have adequate resources.

Student mental health concerns are of ‘utmost importance’

In October, the Fort Worth Report reached out to all 12 school districts in the Fort Worth area to ask how they handle their students’ mental health. Aledo, Burleson, Castleberry and Lake Worth ISDs did not respond by publication time. 

Fort Worth ISD has had a system in place since 2002 to ensure all students’ mental health needs are addressed, said Cesar Padilla, the district’s communications coordinator. 

The district uses a multi-tiered system of supports framework that integrates prevention and intervention support. It collaborates with Mental Health Connection and also follows the Safe and Supportive School Program, Padilla said. 

Counselors at Northwest ISD reach out to parents and caregivers to inform concerns or provide services once they are aware that a student is in crisis, said Jamie Farber, the district’s director of guidance and counseling. Counselors sometimes hear from the students themselves or from friends, teachers or through social media posts. 

“Student mental health concerns are of the utmost importance to not only keep our students

safe, but to also help them be successful with academic and other endeavors,” Farber said. 

How districts approach mental health differently

Crowley ISD focuses on open conversations intended to educate teachers and students on what mental health is and how they can find support, said Trina Lane, the district’s executive director of counseling services. 

“We allow student-led conversations to take place and also guide and support educators with resources for themselves or others,” Lane said. 

A group of 60 high school students across Northwest ISD will become wellness ambassadors this year, Farber said. They will attend a wellness summit and assist counselors in areas like suicide, bullying and substance use.

“Students are the eyes and ears to the well-being of their peers. More often than not, students

may go to their peers first,” she said. “Peers must know when and how to get trusted adults involved.”

How school districts offer telehealth

Established in 2019 after the Santa Fe High School shooting, the Texas Child Health Access Through Telemedicine is now available for 723 school districts and over 3.6 million students statewide. 

The program was a part of the Texas Child Mental Health Care Consortium, which received $337 million in state funding — $173 million of which goes to telemedicine efforts. 

Among districts in the Fort Worth area, Eagle-Mountain Saginaw, Keller and Northwest ISDs are partnering with the telehealth service to meet students’ mental health needs. 

‘We don’t have enough’

Leti Gudino, a Communities In Schools mental health counselor in Everman ISD, works with elementary school children. She says that students’ mental health needs are not always obvious.

Gudino previously worked with two students who had selective mutism. At home, they would talk. At school, they were silent.

Gudino feared that without a counselor like her intervening, the students would silently move through school. 

“They have good grades because they’re completing the work, but they have no social skills, no friends, no socializing — nothing like that,” Gudino said. “It was very lonely for them.”

She taught the students coping skills to help them overcome their fear and anxiety in social settings. What they needed, she said, was an adult who could help them be comfortable.

Now both students speak at school and have friends. 

“That’s really rewarding because that means they’re implementing everything that they’re learning. They’re doing good in the classroom,” Gudino said.

Gudino and Kandel, the social worker at Fort Worth ISD’s Briscoe Elementary, see their work as so important for students. Yet, they agree Texas can do a better job of helping provide adequate mental health resources to students.

“I feel like we don’t have enough mental health resources in school settings,” Gudino said.

Already, they are worried about whether their services will continue past 2024. Many districts are using federal pandemic relief dollars to fund mental health resources for students.

The funding expires in fall 2024.

Mental health survey

Aledo ISD

No response

Burleson ISD

No response

    Castleberry ISD

    No response

    Crowley ISD

    How does your district handle students’ mental health?

    Crowley ISD has a self-referral, teacher, parent, or peer referral process. If a student is struggling, it is encouraged that they preferably see their school counselor or social emotional learning specialists. If they are not available, many of the adults on campus have been trained in Mental Health First Aid and can assist the student in getting needed support.

    What resources and interventions are available to students?

    Our district utilizes “Character Strong” a comprehensive program that addresses Tier One supports to build strong social/emotional skills within the classrooms. This program is designed to equip students with skills needed to address obstacles that might impact their mental health, as well as foundational peer relationships and kindness to name a few.

    How many counselors are in the district? How are they distributed among your campuses?

    We have a total of 41 counseling positions. Each of the 16 elementary campuses have one counselor each, middle schools have two to three counselors, depending on the campus size, ninth grade campuses have two each and senior high schools have anywhere between five to six counselors.

    Does your district have a unique approach to helping students’ well-being? If so, please describe it.

    Our approach is directed at conversation and education about what mental health is and how we get support and support others. We allow student-led conversations to take place and also guide and support educators with resources for themselves or others.

    How many students use the mental health resources that your district provides to them?

    This number fluctuates by campus, issue and or severity of needs. It’s hard to put an exact number. Every student has access to school counselors, but not all of them utilize them as a resource.

    How does your district involve parents when it comes to mental health-related discussions with students?

    When a student is struggling mentally it is imperative that parents are aware. So each time a student is in crisis low, moderate, or high the parent or guardian is contacted.

    Eagle Mountain-Saginaw ISD

    How does your district handle students’ mental health?

    EMS ISD works to address mental health using a variety of materials, programs and strategies to meet the varying needs of students where they are in their mental health journeys.

    First, we coordinate a Mental Health Awareness educational campaign every May where we teach both students and staff:

    1. We all have mental health to tend to; talking about it and building awareness reduces stigma
    2. There are warning signs a person may display when they need help
    3. How and where to reach out for support, both at school and within the greater community
    4. Wellness apps and healthy habits that can contribute to mental wellness

    We also share the following newsletters with parents during the school year:>

    Additionally, when we become aware a student may be experiencing mental unwellness, we seek to intervene. This involves looping in the parent, providing initial and as needed individualized supports, and offering outside resources for ongoing support.

    What resources and interventions are available to students?

    We have school counselors and intervention counselors available at all 30 campuses, as well as special education counselors serving identified students. They provide support, interventions and referrals to outside resources for ongoing/specialized support as needed. When a student is considering outside mental health support, we provide them with referrals for the level of care needed (counseling, psychiatrist, hospital, etc.)

    How many counselors are in the district? How are they distributed among your campuses?

    We currently have 62 general education counselors (47 school counselors, 13 intervention counselors, 1 Director of Counseling, 1 Coordinator of Crisis Intervention). Special Education counselors (9 in district) serve kids (with counseling as part of their service plan) in a feeder pattern. General education counselors are distributed as follows:

    • High schools each have 5 school counselors and 1 intervention counselor
    • Middle schools each have 2 school counselors and 1 intervention counselor
    • Elementary schools each have 1 school counselor and share 3 intervention counselors among campuses
    • Roughly how much does the district spend on mental health-related resources for students?

      This is hard to determine because the work done for the well-being of mental health impacts every student, and it is more than just a program or a category.

      Does your district have a unique approach to helping students’ well-being? If so, please describe it.

      We partner with Texas Child Health Access Through Telemedicine (TCHATT) to close the gap for mental healthcare. TCHATT allows us to quickly meet student’s mental health needs as well as works to connect them to longer-term services.

      How many students use the mental health resources that your district provides to them?

      All 23,300+ students across the district receive support from our department that includes classroom guidance lessons, guest speaker presentations, and access to school counselors as needed for mental health support or intervention.

      How does your district involve parents when it comes to mental health-related discussions with students?

      Our counselors are reaching out to parents regularly. Any mental health concern an individual student may have would prompt reaching out to parents. Parents/guardians are the primary support for students and the only ones who can grant consent for healthcare. Additionally, we have parent events every year that focus on mental health (trends, drug abuse prevention, etc.) as well as resources such as our Mental Health and Suicide Awareness newsletters and information/activities included in the annual Mental Health Awareness campaign.

    Everman ISD

    How does your district handle students’ mental health?

    Our goal is to address mental health needs prior to there being an outcry of self-harm or suicidal ideation. We do this in several ways including having Hope Squads on campuses. Hope Squad is a peer-to-peer system of support. Hope Squad members are nominated by peers and after nominated, are taught what to listen and look for in their friends. If they see or hear something that concerns them, they get help from a trusted adult to keep their friends safe.

    We also partner with our Educational Service Center, Region 11 who partners with local law enforcement to provide a program called Handle with Care. If a child has been on the scene of an incident that could potentially be traumatic for the child the next day at school, the law enforcement agency lets Region 11 know and we get a notification that we need to handle the particular student with care. No details, just know there was something that happened with the student.

    What resources and interventions are available to students?

    We have small group and individual counseling available for those students at the highest need. We have an agreement with The Boys and Girls club to provide teaching on mental health issues and handling them in healthy ways. The guidance lessons that are provided by counselors always have a component of intervening and giving solutions to struggles that students may have.

    How many counselors are in the district? How are they distributed among your campuses?

    We have a total of 18 counselors employed by Everman ISD. We have one counselor at each of our 6 elementary campuses. We then have one at our STEM Jr. High campus, three at our other junior high campus, five at our high school, one at our high school of choice, one that focuses on students served by special education, and one who helps with counseling throughout all campuses. We also have a Safe Haven counselor who is housed in our district as well as 5 Communities In Schools program managers.

    Does your district have a unique approach to helping students’ well-being? If so, please describe it.

    Our superintendent, Dr. Felicia Donaldson, has a huge heart for students’ well-being. She is willing to discuss any ideas that will help students with their well-being. The Mental Wellness Fair that we will be holding in the early spring for our families is her idea. Additionally, our superintendent has had “You Matter” cards created that will be passed out to students. One side of the card says “You Matter.” These will be distributed to students throughout the district to help all students to know and remember that YOU matter.

    How many students use the mental health resources that your district provides to them?

    We have an estimated 25% of students in our district that utilize mental health resources. This number, however, does not include the resources that are provided to all students.

    How does your district involve parents when it comes to mental health-related discussions with students?

    Our parents are vital to the well-being of our students’ academic and mental success. We involve parents when a student makes an outcry of self-harm or suicidal ideation. Our plan this spring is to have a Mental Wellness Fair for parents as well as plan and hold additional meetings regarding how parents can effectively help students who are suffering with common mental health issues such as anxiety and depression.

    Fort Worth ISD

    How does your district handle students’ mental health?

    FWISD proactively addresses student’s mental health and well-being by following the Texas Model for a comprehensive school counseling program that addresses student’s academic as well as mental health needs. Utilizing a multi-tiered systems of supports (MTSS) framework. This framework systemically integrates prevention and intervention support into the school environment promoting the well-being of all students. Additionally, FWISD embeds trauma-informed policies and practices that promote a positive, safe, and supportive school climate and culture aligned with a Safe and Supportive Schools Program (SSSP). In addition to Special Education and 504 accommodations, FWISD has had a system in place since 2002 to make sure all students’ mental health needs can be met. In collaboration with Mental Health Connection, FWISD created a system of care. This is a combination of school counselors, interventionists, and Family Resource Center staff. For students needing additional support outside of the campus, students are referred to the Family Resource Centers to be connected with external providers. In the event of a crisis, additional staff are brought in to support the students and staff at that campus.

    What resources and interventions are available to students?

    As part of the Texas Model for a Comprehensive School Counseling program, school counselors provide tiered services to meet student needs. All students have access to school counselors and intervention specialists/case managers at the campus level. Multi-Tiered System of Support teams meet regularly on campuses to discuss students who need additional support or wraparound services. Students needing further support may be referred to the district’s Family Resource Centers for mental and physical health care.

    Every parent has the option of meeting with a licensed mental health clinician to discuss the needs of their child at the Family Resource Centers. Depending on the needs of the student, the district has many partnerships to make sure all students have access to quality mental health services.

    Most campuses have a Case Manager and an Intervention Specialist who are Licensed Social Workers that provide behavioral-mental health support. They are able to provide campus- based short-term individual and group counseling to students who are experiencing emotional, social, behavioral, or mental health concerns.

    How many counselors are in the district? How are they distributed among your campuses?

    FWISD has 222 school counselors and 88 interventionists/case managers across 142 campuses. Multiple campuses include elementary, middle, and high school students.

    Roughly how much does the district spend on mental health-related resources for students?

    For contracted services at the FRC, $69,000 in local funding and $100,000 in Title funding has been allocated to ensure all students can receive the care they need. In addition to this, FWISD received over $2.5 million in services from providers at no cost to the family or the district.

    Does your district have a unique approach to helping students’ well-being? If so, please describe it.

    We know that healthier students perform better academically. In addition to campus-based support staff, FWISD has many partnerships to make sure that every student’s behavioral, physical, dental, and vision needs are being met. These services are available year-round.

    How many students use the mental health resources that your district provides to them?

    Last year, the Family Resource Center received over 4,000 referrals. Parents of 3,400 students opted to meet with a licensed mental health clinician at the FRC to receive help in addressing the mental health needs of their students. Over 2,400 of these students received direct services from providers at the FRCs and/or directly at their campus. This is in addition to all the students who received care from campus-based counselors and interventionists.

    How does your district involve parents when it comes to mental health-related discussions with students?

    Parents are the experts of their children. Everything that we do is in collaboration and with the consent of the parent.

    Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISD

    How does your district handle students’ mental health?

    We encourage all students and families to be proactive about their student’s mental health. We provide preventative services in the form of guidance lessons and teacher training on mental health, have counselors and social workers available for students’ social, emotional and academic needs, encourage teachers, students and parents to share any mental health concerns with school counselors or the district crisis team to help refer to appropriate services.

    What resources and interventions are available to students?

    We encourage students to speak with their campus counselor, or social worker, Communities In Schools (CIS) mental health counselors for long-term and short term counseling available at the secondary level, CIS program managers at some elementary and secondary schools,outside counseling resources, district crisis team for consultation and collaboration on higher level concerns, partner with Mind Above Matter, an intensive outpatient program for high need students in our district so they do not have to miss significant amounts of school while receiving the help they need.

    How many counselors are in the district? How are they distributed among your campuses?

    We have 47 school counselors, four HEB ISD social workers, and 13 Communities in School Social Workers. Not all schools are the same in staffing for counselors, but every elementary school has at least one counselor and a few also have a .5 if they are larger. Every junior high has two counselors with one having three, L.D. Bell has five counselors, Trinity has six and KEYS and DAEP each have one.

    Roughly how much does the district spend on mental health-related resources for students?

    This question is way too broad for us to answer specifically.

    Does your district have a unique approach to helping students’ well-being? If so, please describe it.

    We are one of the few to offer a school-based IOP-PHP program on a district campus with free transportation provided including scholarships for those who qualify.

    How many students use the mental health resources that your district provides to them?

    Prevention versus interventions. Preventatively counselors provide guidance lessons and check in with any student requesting to speak with them. Last year we had 594 crisis referrals. The crisis team had 1,730 contacts with students. We also partner with Communities in Schools and last year we served over 900 students in HEB between both programs and over 16,000 hours.

    Currently, we have 582 students enrolled through the CIS case-management program and provide 3,761 hours of Tier 1, Tier 2, Tier 3, and Indirect services. Additionally, 52 students are enrolled in our clinical counseling services and have been provided 305 hours of clinical counseling services.

    How does your district involve parents when it comes to mental health-related discussions with students?

    Parents are encouraged to be part of their student’s mental health. The district crisis team sends out a social- emotional newsletter to all families each month to serve as a guide and resource. Any concerns about a student’s mental health is shared with a parent and counselors, social workers and the crisis team work to connect parents with resources, follow-up to make sure families are receiving the help they need. Parents also have access on the district website to submit a parent referral to the district crisis team.

    Keller ISD

    How does your district handle students’ mental health?

    Keller ISD employs numerous counselors, including State Board Educator-Certified School Counselors, Licensed Professional Counselors, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists, Licensed Clinical Social Workers, and Licensed Specialists in School Psychology. These professionals provide Tier r1 supports through guidance lessons and programs, along with Tier 2 and Tier 3 supports through small groups and short-term individual counseling.

    What resources and interventions are available to students?

    Keller ISD partners with Communities in Schools to provide additional Mental Counseling and Case Management to students. Texas Child Health Access Through Telemedicine (TCHATT) is a free service offered throughout the district providing access to mental health services to students. The district has partnered with local mental health experts to create ease of access for students, as needed.

    How many counselors are in the district? How are they distributed among your campuses?

    Keller ISD has approximately 100 State Board Educator-Certified School Counselors, most of which are campus-based and others who may serve throughout the district.

    Roughly how much does the district spend on mental health-related resources for students

    We do not have a budget specifically for mental health-related services, but our annual budget for Counseling is $14.1 million, which includes funds for salaries.

    Does your district have a unique approach to helping students’ well-being? If so, please describe it.

    We believe that we have a responsibility to serve all students to the best of our ability, and so our counselors and staff are committed to meeting the needs of each individual student where they’re at.

    How many students use the mental health resources that your district provides to them?

    The resources we provide are available to all students, and we have many that choose to take advantage of them, but we do not maintain statistics on the specific number served by any specific resource.

    How does your district involve parents when it comes to mental health-related discussions with students?

    Involving parents and guardians throughout a student’s educational journey is crucial to their success, and the same can be said for any mental health-related discussions. We always keep the lines of communication open with families to ensure that they are aware of their students’ needs and know that we are available as a resource to them as well, should they need it.

    Lake Worth ISD

    No response

    Northwest ISD

    How does your district handle students’ mental health?

    Student mental health concerns are of the utmost importance to not only keep our students safe, but to also help them be successful with academic and other endeavors. When a counselor is made aware of a student in crisis, a counselor reaches out to parents and/or caregivers to inform them of the concerns and to provide resources. Sometimes student concerns are brought forward by students themselves, and other times, concerns may be expressed by friends, teachers, or even through social media posts.

    No matter how a counselor is informed of a student concern, all counselors work to support the student in the best way possible. In addition, the school district collaborates with community resources to provide student support groups, mental health services, and supplemental mental health training.

    What resources and interventions are available to students?

    Northwest ISD employs 73 counselors to serve the needs of students through three domains: academic, career/college, and social-emotional. In direct student services, school counselors provide classroom guidance, responsive services, and individual planning meetings. Classroom/group guidance is greatest at the elementary level with individual planning being a large component at the high school level. At all levels, the need for responsive services has increased as well as the indirect student services of referrals, collaboration/consultation, and coordination. School counselors do not conduct long-term therapy; rather, they are triaging and connecting families often to outside resources, much like a school nurse.

    Northwest ISD partners with the Texas Child Health Access Through Telemedicine for NISD students to receive free counseling. Through TCHATT, students receive therapy (intake and four sessions), short-term medication management, and case management into the community. With the TCHATT agreement, students may be able to receive therapy at school; however, on fast-growth campuses, space, scheduling, and the personnel to monitor the session are limited.

    As far as outside mental health resources, Northwest ISD students and families face an additional challenge with few external resources in the 234 square miles of the school district. For example, when students need hospitalization, partial hospitalization, or outpatient treatment, students/families are traveling outside of the school district to access mental health hospitals and outpatient programs. The private and county facilities and programs have not kept pace with the growth of the area.

    More and more providers, private and county, wish to provide services on school campuses; however, again, space, scheduling, and the personnel to monitor the sessions are limited. During the school day, the use of facilities and personnel are at a premium with offices and conference rooms being utilized already by campus personnel for individual and group meetings. The mental health needs today are extensive, but accommodating all the needs and services can be a challenge.

    How many counselors are in the district? How are they distributed among your campuses?

    Does your district have a unique approach to helping students’ well-being? If so, please describe it.

    Total Counselors in Northwest ISD: 73

    Enrollment: 30,848

    Elementary counselors (22):One counselor per campus. Based on our staffing plans, elementary campuses receive a second counselor when they reach or exceed 900 students.

    Middle school counselors (20):Typically three counselors per campus. Approximately 1:333 counselor-to-student ratio.

    High school counselors (21):Teams of six to eight school counselors based on enrollment. Approximately 1:400 or 1:425 counselor-to-student ratio.

    High school campuses also have additional support personnel including:

    • One or two intervention counselors (4)
    • A college and career facilitator
    • A student services facilitator

    Each high school feeder pattern has one or two truancy intervention counselors (4) (counselors/social workers) who work to remove barriers for students and families.

    Early College High School (1): School Counselor

    Special Program Center (District Alternative Education Placement) (1): At-Risk Counselor

    Roughly how much does the district spend on mental health-related sources for students?

    The largest part of resources in the mental health realm is personnel (counselors), and I do not readily know what is spent in salaries for mental health personnel.

    As the fastest-growing school district in North Texas, our building and facilities department is very willing to consider and has designed new schools with the consideration of a group counseling room or calm space in secondary counseling spaces.

    Does your district have a unique approach to helping students’ well-being? If so, please describe it.

    This year at the high school level, we are starting Wellness Ambassadors, a group of students who will assist counselors in focusing on prevention and wellness initiatives in areas such as suicide, bullying/cyberbullying, and substance use.

    We are kicking off the Wellness Ambassador program through a district Wellness Ambassador Summit on November 7. Approximately 60 students from four high schools will attend the Summit to carry back this initiative to their respective campuses. Once back on campus, Wellness Ambassadors will also complete the teen version of Youth Mental Health First Aid course, where they will be trained to do the following:

    • Recognize early warning signs that a friend is developing a mental health or substance use challenge or crisis.
    • Describe how to talk to a friend about mental health and seeking help.
    • Explain when and how to get a responsible adult involved.
    • Discuss where to find appropriate and helpful resources about mental health challenges and professional help.

    Students are the eyes and ears to the well-being of their peers. More often than not, students may go to their peers first. Peers must know when and how to get trusted adults involved.

    How many students use the mental health resources that your district provides to them?

    While it is difficult to measure the total number of students who are accessing internal and/or external mental health resources districtwide, all students have access to counseling services or staff. Internally, visits to the school counselors vary in frequency and time, and school counselors are providing resources to the parents/caregivers of all students experiencing a mental health crisis. Counselors have conducted 202 suicide interventions this year with the following number of suicide interventions in the last two years: 2022-23 – 543 suicide interventions and 2021-22 – 502 suicide interventions.

    As mentioned, students may be accessing a counselor briefly or participating in a group such as Teen Life or a lunch bunch.

    Also, as previously mentioned, counselors may refer any Northwest ISD student for TCHATT services with parent permission. From March 2023 to July 2023, 119 students were referred for services. This school year, 73 students have received TCHATT referrals.

    Personnel and the design of spaces tend to be the biggest needs in health-related sources.

    How does your district involve parents when it comes to mental health-related discussions with students?

    Parents/caregivers are a crucial part of assessing their student’s struggles and well-being in behavioral and mental health concerns. Parents know their children best and offer perspectives that the school team may not know. Counselors ensure collaboration with parents by facilitating conversations, mitigating conflict, and providing resources to families. It takes everyone coming together to best support students who are facing behavioral/mental health challenges.

    White Settlement ISD

    How does your district handle students’ mental health?

    Student health in WSISD is carried out in a layered approach. At tier 1, all students are provided with general wellness supports that include counselor guidance lessons, daily check-ins through the Rhithm App, and positive campus supports of information, celebrations, and opportunities to let someone know if a student needs counseling support.
    Participates in the Education Service Center Region 11 Handle with Care program, school-community partnership that enables local police to notify school districts when they encounter a child at a traumatic scene. This confidential notification allows school staff and mental healthcare providers to discreetly step in and provide the urgent support and interventions needed by the student.

    What resources and interventions are available to students?

    • Guidance and Counseling programming for distribution of guidance lessons, responsive services, individual planning and advisement, and system supports.
    • 7 Mindsets curriculum in kindergarten through 12th grades, which teaches growth mindset, resilience, empathy, relationship building, responsible decision making, etc.
    • Rhithm app enables students to complete daily check in. The quick assessments lead to short 1- to 2-minute activities for regulation in behavior and emotions for optimal learning.
    • Counselors available for individual and group counseling.
    • Communities In Schools social worker at both secondary campuses. These individuals provide multidisciplinary, individualized case management and coordination of resources for referred groups of at least 75 students per campus.Communities In Schools provides the following six components: Supportive Guidance and Counseling; Health & Human Services; Academic support Services; Enrichment Activities; Parent and Family Engagement; and Career and College Readiness.
    • Memorandum of Understanding with Invicta Services Group to provide 5 additional counselors and family counseling in school setting.

    How many counselors are in the district? How are they distributed among your campuses?

    WSISD has 15 school counselors (one at each elementary; two at the intermediate campus; five at the high school, three at the middle school); two student support social workers who support all schools and the alternative campus; and a Communities In Schools social worker at the High School and Middle School.

    Roughly how much does the district spend on mental health-related sources for students?

    $1.6 million (this includes all staffing and the curriculum we use)

    How many students use the mental health resources that your district provides to them?

    All students have access to a campus counselor, student support counselors, guidance lessons, and the Rhithm app. At this time, approximately 150 to175 students/families were utilizing counseling services through Invicta.

    Fort Worth Report is part of the Mental Health Parity Collaborative, a group of newsrooms that are covering stories on mental health care access and inequities in the U.S. The partners on this project include The Carter Center, The Center for Public Integrity, and newsrooms in select states across the country.

    Jacob Sanchez is an enterprise journalist for the Fort Worth Report. Contact him at jacob.sanchez@fortworthreport.org or via Twitter

    Dang Le is a reporting fellow for the Fort Worth Report. Contact him at dang.le@fortworthreport.org or via Twitter

    At the Fort Worth Report, news decisions are made independently of our board members and financial supporters. Read more about our editorial independence policy here.

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